December 7, 2022

How Safe Is the School That Your Children Attend?

Lead paint certification

In a time when schools across America are heading back to the classroom, some parents again find themselves worried about the safety of the educational environments. From lead in water sources in Flint, Michigan, to asbestos problems in Cedar Grove, New Jersey, parents have every reason to be concerned. As more and more schools are getting alarming reports on safety certification levels, it should come as no surprise that an increasing number of people decide to take lead renovator certification training.
All schools and government offices must be inspected to make sure that they do not have unsafe levels of lead and asbestos. As the buildings across the country continue to age, the need for more asbestos and lead renovator certification testers could also increase. In some parts of the country, dangerous asbestos has been covered and sealed rather than removed. As new construction projects or repair work begins, however, some of this asbestos is exposed and must be abated. During the process, as well as following the work, testing helps districts and agencies know if they are still maintaining safe levels.
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) offers both asbestos and lead certification courses. In addition, as more and more information is gathered about the dangers of both lead and asbestos, the EPA also offers asbestos and lead certification renewal courses to make sure that past certificate holders are up to dat on the newest findings and requirements.
And while asbestos is a problem that many homes, schools and agencies feel like they have some control of, the danger of exposure to lead continues to be an increasing concern. Research indicates that 75% of the housing in the U.S. still contains lead paint. As a result, these statistics also show that more than 3 million children who are six years of age and younger already have toxic levels of lead in their bodies. This means that one out of every six children is included in this unhealthy statistic.
The lead renovator certification process trains inspectors how to oversee the repair or expansion of buildings that are trying to get rid of dangerous lead, some in paint, some in pipes. These inspectors use as their basis a law that was put into place years ago. The Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act of 1992, sometimes called Title X, is the source of much of the current laws on lead paint. Although a lengthy and detailed guide, one of the most important requirements in Title X is the disclosure of known lead hazards that must be inspected at the time of the sale or lease of a home built before 1978. So while previous home owners may have elected to not deal with the potential of lead exposure, none of these properties can be purchased or sold without an inspection.

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